Joseph Addison Quotes & Wallpapers

Joseph Addison
Total Quotes: 787


Our Grub-street biographers watch for the death of a great man like so many undertakers on purpose to make a penny of him. Joseph Addison

The care of our national commerce redounds more to the riches and prosperity of the public than any other act of government. Joseph Addison

It is pleasant to see a notorious profligate seized with a concern for religion, and converting his spleen into zeal. Joseph Addison

E'en the rough rocks with tender myrtle bloom, and trodden weeds send out a rich perfume. Joseph Addison

Good-breeding shows itself most where to an ordinary eye it appears the least. Joseph Addison

In rising sighs and falling tears. Joseph Addison

Mankind are more indebted to industry than ingenuity; the gods set up their favors at a price, and industry is the purchaser. Joseph Addison

There is more of turn than of truth in a saying of Seneca, "That drunkenness does not produce but discover faults." Common experience teaches the contrary. Wine throws a man out of himself, and infuses dualities into the mind which she is a stranger to in her sober moments. Joseph Addison

Wine displays every little spot of the soul in its utmost deformity. Joseph Addison

Hudibras has defined nonsense, as Cowley does wit, by negatives. Nonsense, he says, is that which is neither true nor false. These two great properties of nonsense, which are always essential to it, give it such a peculiar advantage over all other writings, that it is incapable of being either answered or contradicted. Joseph Addison

In England we see people lulled sleep with solid and elaborate discourses of piety, who would be warmed and transported out of themselves by the bellowings and distortions of enthusiasm. Joseph Addison

We are apt to rely upon future prospects, and become really expensive while we are only rich in possibility. We live up to our expectations, not to our possessions, and make a figure proportionable to what we may be, not what we are. Joseph Addison

Contentment produces, in some measure, all those effects which the alchemist usually ascribes to what he calls the philosopher's stone; and if it does not bring riches, it does the same thing by banishing the desire for them. Joseph Addison

A fine coat is but a livery when the person who wears it discovers no higher sense than that of a footman. Joseph Addison

Fame is a good so wholly foreign to our natures that we have no faculty in the soul adapted to it, nor any organ in the body to relish it; an object of desire placed out of the possibility of fruition. Joseph Addison

It is folly to seek the approbation of any being besides the Supreme. Joseph Addison

The moral perfections of the Deity, the more attentively, we consider, the more perfectly still shall we know them. Joseph Addison

Honour's a sacred tie, the law of kings, The noble mind's distinguishing perfection That aids and strengthens virtue where it meets her And imitates her actions where she is not: It is not to be sported with. Joseph Addison

Among the English authors, Shakespeare has incomparably excelled all others. That noble extravagance of fancy, which he had in so great perfection, thoroughly qualified him to touch the weak, superstitious part of his readers' imagination, and made him capable of succeeding where he had nothing to support him besides the strength of his own genius. Joseph Addison

It has been said in praise of some men, that they could take whole hours together upon anything; but it must be owned to the honor of the other sex that there are many among them who can talk whole hours together upon nothing. I have known a woman branch out into a long extempore dissertation on the edging of a petticoat, and chide her servant for breaking a china cup, in all the figures of rhetoric. Joseph Addison

A virtuous mind in a fair body is indeed a fine picture in a food light, and therefore it is no wonder that it makes the beautiful sex all over charms. Joseph Addison

A man who is furnished with arguments from the mint will convince his antagonist much sooner than one who draws them from reason and philosophy. Joseph Addison

I think a Person who is thus terrified with the Imagination of Ghosts and Spectres much more reasonable, than one who contrary to the Reports of all Historians sacred and profane, ancient and modern, and to the Traditions of all Nations, thinks the Appearance of Spirits fabulous and groundless. Joseph Addison

Plutarch has written an essay on the benefits which a man may receive from his enemies; and among the good fruits of enmity, mentions this in particular, that by the reproaches which it casts upon us, we see the worst side of ourselves. Joseph Addison

Jealousy is that pain which a man feels from the apprehension that he is not equally beloved by the person whom he entirely loves. Joseph Addison

My voice is still for war. Gods! can a Roman senate long debate Which of the two to choose, slavery or death? Joseph Addison

The moral virtues, without religion are but cold, lifeless, and insipid; it is only religion which opens the mind to great conceptions, fills it with the most sublime ideas, and warms the soul with more than sensual pleasures. Joseph Addison

If you wish success in life, make perseverance your bosom friend, experience your wise counselor, caution your elder brother and hope your guardian genius. Joseph Addison

Admiration is a very short-lived passion, that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object; unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a perpetual succession of miracles rising into view. Joseph Addison

Is it not wonderful, that the love of the [animal] parent should be so violent while it lasts and that it should last no longer than is necessary for the preservation of the young? Joseph Addison

Let echo, too, perform her part, Prolonging every note with art; And in a low expiring strain, Play all the concert o'er again. Joseph Addison

Oh! think what anxious moments pass between The birth of plots, and their last fatal periods, Oh! 'tis a dreadful interval of time, Filled up with horror all, and big with death! Joseph Addison

The ideal man bears the accidents of life With dignity and grace, the best of circumstances. Joseph Addison

From hence, let fierce contending nations know, What dire effects from civil discord flow. Joseph Addison

I would... earnestly advise them for their good to order this paper to be punctually served up, and to be looked upon as a part of the tea equipage. Joseph Addison

Health and cheerfulness mutually beget each other. Joseph Addison

Round-heads and Wooden-shoes are standing jokes. Joseph Addison

I Have often thought if the minds of men were laid open, we should see but little difference between that of the wise man and that of the fool. There are infinite reveries, numberless extravagances, and a perpetual train of vanities which pass through both. The great difference is, that the first knows how to pick and cull his thoughts for conversation, by suppressing some, and communicating others; whereas the other lets them all indifferently fly out in words. Joseph Addison

Man is subject to innumerable pains and sorrows by the very condition of humanity, and yet, as if nature had not sown evils enough in life, we are continually adding grief to grief and aggravating the common calamity by our cruel treatment of one another. Joseph Addison

Oh! think what anxious moments pass between The birth of plots, and their last fatal periods, Oh! 'tis a dreadful interval of time, Filled up with horror all, and big with death! Joseph Addison

There is no talent so pernicious as eloquence to those who have it under command. Joseph Addison

There is no virtue so truly great and godlike as justice. Joseph Addison

Knavery is ever suspicious of knavery. Joseph Addison

Music religious heat inspires, It wakes the soul, and lifts it high, And wings it with sublime desires, And fits it to bespeak the Deity. Joseph Addison

Simonides, a poet famous in his generation, is, I think, author of the oldest satire that is now extant, and, as some say, of the first that was ever written. Joseph Addison

That he delights in the misery of others no man will confess, and yet what other motive can make a father cruel? Joseph Addison

The Mind that lies fallow but a single Day, sprouts up in Follies that are only to be killed by a constant and assiduous Culture. Joseph Addison

There is nothing more requisite in business than despatch. Joseph Addison

He who would pass his declining years with honor and comfort, should, when young, consider that he may one day become old, and remember when he is old, that he has once been young. Joseph Addison

Courage is the thing. All goes if courage goes. Joseph Addison

True benevolence or compassion, extends itself through the whole of existence and sympathizes with the distress of every creature capable of sensation. Joseph Addison

Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed. Joseph Addison

But silence never shows itself to so great an advantage, as when it is made the reply to calumny and defamation, provided that we give no just occasion for them. Joseph Addison

If men of eminence are exposed to censure on one hand, they are as much liable to flattery on the other. If they receive reproaches which are not due to them, they likewise receive praises which they do not deserve. Joseph Addison

A misery is not to be measure from the nature of the evil but from the temper of the sufferer. Joseph Addison

Pride goes before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall. Joseph Addison

Temperance gives nature her full play, and enables her to exert herself in all her force and vigor. Joseph Addison

Colors speak all languages. Joseph Addison

Prejudice and self-sufficiency naturally proceed from inexperience of the world, and ignorance of mankind. Joseph Addison

It is impossible for us, who live in the latter ages of the world, to make observations in criticism, morality, or in any art or science, which have not been touched upon by others. We have little else left us but to represent the common sense of mankind in more strong, more beautiful, or more uncommon lights. Joseph Addison

We find that Good and Evil happen alike to all Men on this Side of the Grave; and as the principle Design of Tragedy is to raise Commiseration and Terror in the Minds of the Audience, we shall defeat this great End, if we always make Virtue and Innocence happy and successful. Joseph Addison

The English Writers of Tragedy are possessed with a Notion, that when they represent a virtuous or innocent Person in Distress, they ought not to leave him till they have delivered him out of his Troubles, or made him triumph over his Enemies. Joseph Addison

I shall endeavour to enliven Morality with Wit, and to temper Wit with Morality, that my Readers may, if possible, both Ways findtheir Account in the Speculation of the Day. Joseph Addison

The only way therefore to try a Piece of Wit, is to translate it into a different Language: If it bears the Test you may pronounceit true; but if it vanishes in the Experiment you may conclude it to have been a Punn. Joseph Addison

What I spent I lost; what I possessed is left to others; what I gave away remains with me. Joseph Addison

Flying would give such occasions for intrigues as people cannot meet with who have nothing but legs to carry them. Joseph Addison

I have somewhere met with the epitaph on a charitable man which has pleased me very much. I cannot recollect the words, but here is the sense of it: "What I spent I lost; what I possessed is left to others; what I gave away remains with me. Joseph Addison

I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Joseph Addison

From social intercourse are derived some of the highest enjoyments of life; where there is a free interchange of sentiments the mind acquires new ideas, and by frequent exercise of its powers, the understanding gains fresh vigor. Joseph Addison

The Gods in bounty work up storms about us, that give mankind occasion to exert their hidden strength, and throw our into practice virtues that shun the day, and lie concealed in the smooth seasons and the calms of life. Joseph Addison



<< PREVIOUS PAGE Page 4 of 12 | NEXT PAGE >
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12  


RELATED TOPICS

Joseph Addison Quotes, Chief Joseph Quotes, Chief Joseph Famous Quote, Joseph Campbell Quotes, Joseph Mccarthy Quotes, Joseph Quotes, Joseph Smith Quotes, Joseph Stalin Quotes, Joseph and Mary Quotes, Joseph Goebbels Propaganda Quotes, Joseph Stalin Quotes On Hitler,