John Locke Quotes & Wallpapers

John Locke
Total Quotes: 395

Inuring children gently to suffer some degrees of pain without shrinking, is a way to gain firmness to their minds, and lay a foundation for courage and resolution in the future part of their lives. John Locke

The first step to get this noble and manly steadiness, is... carefully keep children from frights of all kinds, when they are young. ...Instances of such who in a weak timorous mind, have borne, all their whole lives through, the effects of a fright when they were young, are every where to be seen, and therefore as much as may be to be prevented. John Locke

A man may live long, and die at last in ignorance of many truths, which his mind was capable of knowing, and that with certainty. John Locke

He that from childhood has made rising betimes familiar to him will not waste the best part of his life in drowsiness. John Locke

If by gaining knowledge we destroy our health, we labour for a thing that will be useless in our hands. John Locke

Affectation is an awkward and forced imitation of what should be genuine and easy, wanting the beauty that accompanies what is natural. John Locke

Justice and truth are the common ties of society John Locke

Who lies for you will lie against you. John Locke

Crooked things may be as stiff and unflexible as streight: and Men may be as positive and peremptory in Error as in Truth. John Locke

Thirdly, the supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent: for the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires, that the people should have property, without which they must be supposed to lose that, by entering into society, which was the end for which they entered into it; too gross an absurdity for any man to own. John Locke

For a man's property is not at all secure, though there be good and equitable laws to set the bounds of it, between him and his fellow subjects, if he who commands those subjects, have power to take from any private man, what part he pleases of his property, and use and dispose of it as he thinks good. John Locke

Habits wear more constantly and with greatest force than reason, which, when we have most need of it, is seldom fairly consulted, and more rarely obeyed John Locke

He that judges without informing himself to the utmost that he is capable, cannot acquit himself of judging amiss John Locke

All mankind... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions. John Locke

As people are walking all the time, in the same spot, a path appears. John Locke

Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him. John Locke

What worries you, masters you. John Locke

It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of the truth. John Locke

If any one shall claim a power to lay and levy taxes on the people by his own authority and without such consent of the people, he thereby invades the fundamental law of property, and subverts the end of government. John Locke

[I]t being reasonable and just, I should have a right to destroy that which threatens me with destruction: for by the fundamental law of nature, man being to be preserved as much as possible, when all cannot be preserved, the safety of the innocent is to be preferred: and one may destroy a man who makes war upon him, or has discovered an enmity to his being, for the same reason that he may kill a Wolf or a lion.... John Locke

If to break loose from the bounds of reason, and to want that restraint of examination and judgment which keeps us from choosing or doing the worst, be liberty, true liberty, madmen and fools are the only freemen: but yet, I think, nobody would choose to be mad for the sake of such liberty, but he that is mad already. John Locke

We are born with faculties and powers capable almost of anything, such at least as would carry us farther than can easily be imagined: but it is only the exercise of those powers, which gives us ability and skill in any thing, and leads us towards perfection. John Locke

Man is not permitted without censure to follow his own thoughts in the search of truth, when they lead him ever so little out of the common road. John Locke

Since the great foundation of fear is pain, the way to harden and fortify children against fear and danger is to accustom them to suffer pain. John Locke

The rising unto place is laborious, and by pains men come to greater pains; and it is sometimes base, and by indignities men come to dignities. John Locke

In the discharge of thy place set before thee the best examples; for imitation is a globe of precepts. John Locke

Try all things, hold fast that which is good. John Locke

The reservedness and distance that fathers keep, often deprive their sons of that refuge which would be of more advantage to them than an hundred rebukes or chidings. John Locke

A criminal who, having renounced reason ... hath, by the unjust violence and slaughter he hath committed upon one, declared war against all mankind, and therefore may be destroyed as a lion or tiger, one of those wild savage beasts with whom men can have no society nor security. John Locke

Children should from the beginning be bred up in an abhorrence of killing or tormenting any living creature; and be taught not to spoil or destroy any thing, unless it be for the preservation or advantage of some other that is nobler. John Locke

When we know our own strength, we shall the better know what to undertake with hopes of success... John Locke

Faith is the assent to any proposition not made out by the deduction of reason but upon the credit of the proposer. John Locke

The great question which, in all ages, has disturbed mankind, and brought on them the greatest part of their mischiefs ... has been, not whether be power in the world, nor whence it came, but who should have it. John Locke

All sects, as far as reason will help them, gladly use it; when it fails them, they cry out it is a matter of faith, and above reason. John Locke

The wisdom and goodness of the Maker plainly appears in the parts of this stupendous fabric, and the several degrees and ranks of creatures in it. John Locke

All virtue lies in a power of denying our own desires where reason does not authorize them. John Locke

If an ingenuous detestation of falsehood be but carefully and early instilled, that is the true and genuine method to obviate dishonesty. John Locke

Curiosity in children Nature has provided to remove the ignorance they were born with. John Locke

He that has complex ideas, without particular names for them, would be in no better case than a book-seller who had volumes that lay unbound and without titles, which he could make known to others only by showing the loose sheets. John Locke

Virtue and talents, though allowed their due consideration, yet are not enough to procure a man a welcome wherever he comes. Nobody contents himself with rough diamonds, or wears them so. When polished and set, then they give a lustre. John Locke

He that uses his words loosely and unsteadily will either not be minded or not understood. John Locke

As usurpation is the exercise of power which another has a right to, so tyranny is the exercise of power beyond right, which nobody can have a right to. John Locke

General observations drawn from particulars are the jewels of knowledge, comprehending great store in a little room; but they are therefore to be made with the greater care and caution, lest, if we take counterfeit for true, our loss and shame be the greater when our stock comes to a severe scrutiny. John Locke

Action [is] the great business of mankind, and the whole matter about which all laws are conversant. John Locke

What humanity abhors, custom reconciles and recommends to us. John Locke

There cannot any one moral rule be proposed whereof a man may not justly demand a reason. Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The people cannot delegate to government the power to do anything which would be unlawful for them to do themselves. John Locke

..every Man has a Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself. The Labour of his Body, and the Work of his Hands, we may say, are properly his. .... The great and chief end therefore, of Mens uniting into Commonwealths, and putting themselves under Government, is the Preservation of their Property. John Locke

He that in the ordinary affairs of life would admit of nothing but direct plain demonstration would be sure of nothing in this world but of perishing quickly. John Locke

So difficult it is to show the various meanings and imperfections of words when we have nothing else but words to do it with. John Locke

Let the awe [the teacher] has upon [children's] minds be so tempered with the constant marks of tenderness and good will, that affection may spur them to their duty, and make them find a pleasure in complying with his dictates. This will bring them with satisfaction to their tutor; make them hearken to him, as to one who is their friend, that cherishes them, and takes pains for their good; this will keep their thoughts easy and free, whilst they are with him, the only temper wherein the mind is capable of receiving new information, and of admitting into itself those impressions. John Locke

Since nothing appears to me to give Children so much becoming Confidence and Behavior, and so raise them to the conversation of those above their Age, as Dancing. I think they should be taught to dance as soon as they are capable of learning it. John Locke

Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed. John Locke

Mathematical proofs, like diamonds, are hard and clear, and will be touched with nothing but strict reasoning. John Locke

Every man must some time or other be trusted to himself. John Locke

Nothing is in the intellect that was not first in the senses. John Locke

If we will disbelieve everything, because we cannot certainly know all things, we shall do much what as wisely as he who would not use his legs, but sit still and perish, because he had no wings to fly. John Locke

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts. John Locke

Where there is no property there is no injustice. John Locke

It is of great use to the sailor to know the length of his line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the ocean. John Locke

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it. John Locke

An excellent man, like precious metal, is in every way invariable; A villain, like the beams of a balance, is always varying, upwards and downwards. John Locke

Not time is the measure of movement but: ...each constant periodic appearance of ideas. John Locke

Action is the great business of mankind, and the whole matter about which all laws are conversant. John Locke

The necessity of pursuing true happiness is the foundation of all liberty- Happiness, in its full extent, is the utmost pleasure we are capable of. John Locke

Whoever uses force without Right ... puts himself into a state of War with those, against whom he uses it, and in that state all former Ties are canceled, all other Rights cease, and every one has a Right to defend himself, and to resist the Aggressor. John Locke

There is no such way to gain admittance, or give defence to strange and absurd Doctrines, as to guard them round about with Legions of obscure, doubtful, and undefin'd Words. John Locke

He that has his chains knocked off, and the prison doors set open to him, is perfectly at liberty, because he may either go or stay, as he best likes; though his preference be determined to stay, by the darkness of the night, or illness of the weather, or want of other lodging. John Locke

In short, herein seems to lie the difference between idiots and madmen, that madmen put wrong ideas together, and so make wrong propositions, but argue and reason right from them: but idiots make very few or no propositions, and reason scarce at all. John Locke

I am sure, zeal or love for truth can never permit falsehood to be used in the defense of it. John Locke

A father would do well, as his son grows up, and is capable of it, to talk familiarly with him; nay, ask his advice, and consult with him about those things wherein he has any knowledge or understanding. By this, the father will gain two things, both of great moment. The sooner you treat him as a man, the sooner he will begin to be one; and if you admit him into serious discourses sometimes with you, you will insensibly raise his mind above the usual amusements of youth, and those trifling occupations which it is commonly wasted in. John Locke

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