Charles Dickens Quotes & Wallpapers

Charles Dickens
Total Quotes: 1361


We spent as much money as we could and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did. To the best of my belief, our case was in the last aspect a rather common one. Charles Dickens

I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude. Charles Dickens

When a man says he's willin', said Mr. Barkis, it's as much as to say, that man's a-waitin' for a answer. Charles Dickens

I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen. Charles Dickens

Never see... a dead post-boy, did you? inquired Sam... No, rejoined Bob, I never did. No! rejoined Sam triumphantly. Nor never vill; and there's another thing that no man never see, and that's a dead donkey. Charles Dickens

Thirty years ago, Marseilles lay burning in the sun, one day. Charles Dickens

Indifference to all the actions and passions of mankind was not supposed to be such a distinguished quality at that time, I think. I have known it very fashionable indeed. I have seen it displayed with such success that I have encountered some fine ladies and gentlemen who might as well have been born caterpillars. Charles Dickens

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humor. Charles Dickens

O, if the good deeds of human creatures could be traced to their source, how beautiful would even death appear; for how much charity, mercy, and purified affection would be seen to have growth in dusty graves! Charles Dickens

Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. To begin my life with the beginning of my life, I record that I was born (as I have been informed and believe) on a Friday, at twelve o"clock at night. It was remarked that the clock began to strike, and I began to cry, simultaneously. Charles Dickens

There are chords in the human heart- strange, varying strings- which are only struck by accident; which will remain mute and senseless to appeals the most passionate and earnest, and respond at last to the slightest casual touch. Charles Dickens

Please, sir, I want some more. Charles Dickens

And how did little Tim behave?" asked Mrs Cratchit, when she had rallied Bob on his credulity and Bob had hugged his daughter to his heart's content. "As good as gold," said Bob, "and better. Somehow he gets thoughtful, sitting by himself so much, and thinks the strangest things you ever heard. He told me, coming home, that he hoped the people saw him in the church, because he was a cripple, and it might be pleasant to them to remember upon Christmas Day, who made lame beggars walk, and blind men see. Charles Dickens

Perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on. Charles Dickens

a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others. Charles Dickens

It is not easy to walk alone in the country without musing upon something. Charles Dickens

Blackened skeleton arms of wood by the wayside pointed upward to the convent, as if the ghosts of former travellers, overwhelmed by the snow, haunted the scene of their distress. Icicle-hung caves and cellars built for refuges from sudden storms, were like so many whispers of the perils of the place; never-resting wreaths and mazes of mist wandered about, hunted by a moaning wind; and snow, the besetting danger of the mountain, against which all its defences were taken, drifted sharply down. Charles Dickens

The flowers that sleep by night, opened their gentle eyes and turned them to the day. The light, creation's mind, was everywhere, and all things owned its power. Charles Dickens

Heaven suits the back to the burden. Charles Dickens

Every failure teaches a man something, if he will but learn. Charles Dickens

I think the Romans must have aggravated one another very much, with their noses. Perhaps, they became the restless people they were, in consequence. Charles Dickens

You know what I am going to say. I love you. What other men may mean when they use that expression, I cannot tell. What I mean is that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction which I have resisted in vain, and which overmasters me. You could draw me to fire, you could draw me to water, you could draw me to the gallows, you could draw me to any death, you could draw me to anything I have most avoided, you could draw me to any exposure and disgrace. This and the confusion of my thoughts, so that I am fit for nothing, is what I mean by your being the ruin of me. Charles Dickens

It was one of those hot, silent nights, when people sit at windows listening for the thunder which they know will shortly break; when they recall dismal tales of hurricanes and earthquakes; and of lonely travellers on open plains, and lonely ships at sea, struck by lightning. Charles Dickens

When we came within sight of the sea, the waves on the horizon, caught at intervals above the rolling abyss, were like glimpses of another shore with towers and buildings. Charles Dickens

And the voices in the waves are always whispering to Florence, in their ceaseless murmuring, of love - of love, eternal and illimitable, not bounded by the confines of this world, or by the end of time, but ranging still, beyond the sea, beyond the sky, to the invisible country far away! Charles Dickens

When she took her opposite place in the carriage corner, the brightness in her face was so charming to behold, that on her exclaiming, "What beautiful stars and what a glorious night!" the Secretary said "Yes," but seemed to prefer to see the night and the stars in the light of her lovely little countenance, to looking out of window. Charles Dickens

He did each single thing as if he did nothing else. Charles Dickens

There is something good in all weathers. If it doesn't happen to be good for my work today, it's good for some other man's today... and will come around for me tomorrow. Charles Dickens

I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes. Charles Dickens

Shall we speak of the inspiration of a poet or a priest, and not of the heart impelled by love and self-devotion to the lowliest work in the lowliest way of life? Charles Dickens

Although I am an old man, night is generally my time for walking. Charles Dickens

To close the eyes, and give a seemly comfort to the apparel of the dead, is poverty's holiest touch of nature. Charles Dickens

Long may it remain in this mixed world a question not easy of decision, which is the more beautiful evidence of the Almighty's goodness, the soft white hand formed for the ministrations of sympathy and tenderness, or the rough hard hand which the heart softens, teaches, and guides in a moment. Charles Dickens

I would like to be going all over the kingdom...and acting everywhere. There's nothing in the world equal to seeing the house rise at you, one sea of delightful faces, one hurrah of applause! Charles Dickens

Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; - the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine! Charles Dickens

Good never come of such evil, a happier end was not in nature to so unhappy a beginning. Charles Dickens

I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss. I see the lives for which I lay down my life, peaceful, useful, prosperous and happy. I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts, and in the hearts of their descendants, generations hence. It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. Charles Dickens

I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies. Charles Dickens

Come in, - come in! and know me better, man! I am the Ghost of Christmas Present. Look upon me! You have never seen the like of me before! Charles Dickens

Ride on! Ride on over all obstacles and win the race. Charles Dickens

And numerous indeed are the hearts to which Christmas brings a brief season of happiness and enjoyment. Charles Dickens

Battledore and shuttlecock's a very good game, when you an't the shuttlecock and two lawyers the battledores, in which case it gets too excitin' to be pleasant. Charles Dickens

A good, contented, well-breakfasted juryman, is a capital thing to get hold of. Discontented or hungry jurymen, my dear Sir, always find for the plaintiff. Charles Dickens

You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are! Charles Dickens

People can't die, along the coast,' said Mr. Peggotty, 'except when the tide's pretty nigh out. They can't be born, unless it's pretty nigh in-not properly born, till flood. He's a going out with the tide. Charles Dickens

Fog everywhere.... The raw afternoon is rawest, and the dense fog is densest, and the muddy streets are muddiest, near that leadenheaded old obstruction, appropriate ornament for the threshold of a leaden-headed old corporation: Temple Bar. And hard by Temple Bar, in Lincoln's Inn Hall, at the very heart of the fog, sits the Lord High Chancellor in his High Court of Chancery. Charles Dickens

I expect a Judgment. On the day of Judgment. Charles Dickens

think the Romans must have aggravated one another very much, with their noses. Perhaps, they became the restless people they were, in consequence. Charles Dickens

Wal'r, my boy, replied the Captain, in the Proverbs of Solomon you will find the following words, 'May we never want a friend in need, nor a bottle to give him!' When found, make a note of. Charles Dickens

Mr. Chadband is a large yellow man, with a fat smile, and a general appearance of having a good deal of train oil in his system. Charles Dickens

I am the only child of parents who weighed, measured, and priced everything; for whom what could not be weighed, measured, and priced, had no existence. Charles Dickens

And if it's proud to have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts, Miss Jenny struck in, flushed, she is proud. Charles Dickens

It will be very generally found that those who will sneer habitually at human nature... are among its worst and least pleasant samples. Charles Dickens

We cannot have single gentlemen to come into this establishment and sleep like double gentlemen without paying extra for it... Charles Dickens

We didn't find that it [London] come up to its likeness in the red bills - it is there drawd too architectooralooral. Charles Dickens

If your governor don't prove a alleybi, he'll be what the Italians call reg'larly flummoxed. Charles Dickens

Say, like those wicked Turks, there is no What's-his-name but Thingummy, and What-you-may-call-it is his prophet! Charles Dickens

She's a swellin' wisibly before my wery eyes. Charles Dickens

A Being, erect upon two legs, and bearing all the outward semblance of a man, and not of a monster. Charles Dickens

Therefore I do require it, which I makes confession, to be brought reg'lar and draw'd mild. Charles Dickens

It's calm and - what's that word again - critical! - no - classical, that's it - it is calm and classical. Charles Dickens

Man's courses forshadow certain ends; but if these courses be departed from these ends will change. Charles Dickens

Ven you're a married man, Samivel, you'll understand a good many things you don't understand now; but vether it's worth while, goin' through so much, to learn so little, as the charity-boy said ven he got to the end of the alphabet, is a matter o' taste. Charles Dickens

A lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper - a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make everybody more or less uncomfortable. Charles Dickens

He'd be sharper than a serpent's tooth, if he wasn't as dull as ditch water. Charles Dickens

No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot. Charles Dickens

I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world. Charles Dickens

It is a pleasant world we live in, sir, a very pleasant world. There are bad people in it, Mr. Richard, but if there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers. Charles Dickens

I don't feel any vulgar gratitude to you[for helping me]. I almost feel as if You ought to be grateful to ME, for giving you the opportunity of enjoying the luxury of generosity. . . I may have come into the world expressly for the purpose of increasing your stock of happiness. I may have been born to be a benefactor to you, by giving you an opportunity of assisting me. Charles Dickens

He thought of the number of girls and women she had seen marry, how many homes with children in them she had seen grow up around her, how she had contentedly pursued her own lone quite path-for him. ~ Stephen speaking of Rachael Charles Dickens



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